Politics and Text Messaging


The full title was going to be “Politics and text messaging, why I don’t follow politics, why I don’t like long conversations over text messages, and even more specifically why I especially hate text messaging conversations about politics” but that may have been too long. But, that being said, that’s exactly what this blog is about, and I have a friend of mine to thank for that. He started a text “flame war” with me this morning, and I wasn’t in the mood. Instead, I’m voicing my opinions here (and on a keyboard much more favorable to typing a document of this type).


Let me break it down…


Text messages…. I love to get texts. It’s fun, messages can be short and concise. But, I’m a firm believer in the simple concept of “If you want to talk to me, call me.” (Note: This blog is not a passive request to stop texting me, far from it!) I’m just not a huge fan of having full-out conversations over texts. I do it, simply because it’s a popular means to communicate these days, especially with the rise of “Unlimited” texting plans, and the fall of said plans’ pricing. I also understand that it makes sense sometimes to communicate this way due to one participant (or both) being in surroundings that don’t favor talking on the phone (ie loud bar, train where it’s quiet, etc.) I get that, trust me, and I have no problem with that. What bothers me about text, and this refers to “words” in general, regardless of on a phone or AIM, etc, text on a screen carries no emotive content whatsoever, so it’s impossible to determine howcertain words are being said, that’s left up to the other participant(s). It’s also much much more impersonal. But, it is what it is. I deal.


Politics… I couldn’t tell you the difference between a Republican and a Democrat, I have no idea, and that’s fine with me. I think Obama is good, and I didn’t like Bush, so does that make me a Democrat? Apparently? But that doesn’t really matter to me. I vote for the person who is going to put in an effort to make things right, and who appeals to me as an American citizen, and as an individual. The way things have been going in this country wasn’t working when Bushmeister was driving the ship, so someone came in and stirred things up. At the last election, the other guy (McCain) seemed like he had other priorities in mind so I didn’t vote for him. Evidently neither did most of the country, because he lost.


In the aforementioned text-message flame-war, I was told that my not following politics was essentially me “not standing up for my freedoms.” Not true. I don’t follow politics because I don’t feel like listening to mindless arguing. I’ll follow it when it comes down to the vote, where I can make a difference. When it’s up to me, I’ll throw in my $.02. Before that, when it’s all over news and discussion shows, and the McLoughlin group, and all that bullshit– I am more than happy to put my attention elsewhere!!! If nobody is asking me what I think, and I have no means to contribute, why bother putting any attention towards it. I think that makes sense. I call that being efficient, effective use of time. To further clarify, it’s not that I don’t care, I’m just not interested until it comes down to the vote. You show me the facts and figures, I’ll make my decision. The debates and arguments leading up to it, I can do without those.


So, do I follow politics? Yes and no. I follow it every few years a few months before the election, or I’ll read a news article or two if something big is going on. I followed on Twitter while they were signing that big healthcare bill. I watched some CNN videos explaining it, but then I went about my business. I didn’t feel the need to discuss it, because I didn’t feel like entering into a big debate on the spot, as that tends to happen with politics discussions. Everyone has their own opinion on politics, and I prefer to let it stay that way until there’s an opportunity for me to put in my $.02, at which point I go and vote, and move on with my life.


‘Nuff said.




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